Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Musing Monday - fairy tales & alternate histories


Musing Monday, March 20, 2017

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:


  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

 I’m currently reading…


The Case of the Missing Moonstone (The Wollstonecraft Detective Agency #1)
by Jordan Stratford & Kelly Murphy

I was looking through lists of alternate history novels on Goodreads last week after finishing up, and love, Front Lines. I came across this one in the lists and saw that my local public library had an available ebook copy, so I downloaded it. I haven't been spending a lot of time reading it because my phone has been tied up in casting Netflix onto my TV for me, but what I have read so far I've really enjoyed. Ada is a fun character so far and I look very forward to getting to know her and Mary better.


What caught my attention about this one specifically out of all the books I was looking at was the premise. Ada Lovelace and Mary Shelley meet as young girls, become friends, and form a detective agency. It reminds me very much of another series I have recently enjoyed, the Stoker & Holmes series where Sherlock's niece and Bram's sister become friends and solve mysteries and hunt vampires in a Steampunk London.


I have high hopes for my enjoyment of this book so we'll see if it lives up to them.
History, mystery, and science collide in a new series for middle-grade readers, perfect for fans of The Mysterious Benedict Society and Lemony Snicket! 

Jordan Stratford imagines an alternate 1826, where Ada Lovelace (the world’s first computer programmer) and Mary Shelley (author of Frankenstein) meet as girls and form a secret detective agency!

Lady Ada Byron, age eleven, is a genius. Isolated, awkward and a bit rude—but a genius. Mary Godwin, age fourteen, is a romantic. Adventurous, astute, and kind, Mary is to become Ada’s first true friend. And together, the girls conspire to form the Wollstonecraft Detective Agency—a secret constabulary for the apprehension of clever criminals. Their first case involves a stolen heirloom, a false confession, and an array of fishy suspects. But it’s no match for the deductive powers and bold hearts of Ada and Mary.

Mystery fans will love this tween girl riff on Sherlock Holmes and John Watson. History buffs will be delighted to see all the real figures who play a role in this story and appreciate the extensive backmatter that helps separate truth from fiction. Parents and educators hoping to promote the STEM fields for girls will be thrilled to have a series where two girls use math, science, and creative analytical thinking to solve crimes. But most espicially--emerging readers will love this series filled with humor, action, intrigue and wonderful artwork from Kelly Murphy. -- via Goodreads

        THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: What do think of fairy tales in general? The book versions and their movie counter parts?


I love fairy tales. One of my favourite classes in my undergraduate program was my children's literature class where we spent a good deal of time looking at the old school fairy tales and their influence. I think there's always going to be room for the classic tales, and for the modern adaptations on their themes and stories. Some modern fairy tales that I have enjoyed in book form include:


  1. Patricia C. Wrede's Enchanted Forest Chronicles
  2. the Modern Faerie Tales series by Holly Black
  3. Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce
  4. the fairy tales in A.S. Byatt's Elementals: Stories of Fire and Ice
  5. Bill Willingham's Fables comic series
As a Disney fan it's probably obvious that I enjoy film adaptations of fairy tales as well as I do those written in books. As with books I like the classical adaptations, like those depicted in the Disney films, we well as the more modern and irreverent versions. Films like The Princess Bride and Hoodwinked definitely speak to that.


What's your favourite modern fairy tale?



Saturday, 18 March 2017

Something There That Wasn't There Before - a review of Beauty and the Beast (2017)




Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme.  Any Disney fan knows these words and the ones that follow in the classic title song for ‘Beauty and the Beast’.  It’s a wonderful classic tale of a beautiful girl and a cursed selfish prince, destined to spend his days as a hideous beast unless he can find love before the final petal falls from the enchanted rose.  We all know the story, we’ve all fell in love with the award winning animated film but Disney have know remade the classic as a live action film as it has been doing with many of them lately (Cinderella, Jungle Book etc).  


I had big expectations going into this and I was not disappointed.  I was delighted as the cast was announced, many of my favourite actors and actresses signing up for roles.  Much had been made of Emma Watson being cast as Belle and for me, she did a bang up job.  Yes she can sing, yes she can act and thanks to her role as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series, she was perfectly suited to bookish Belle, always with her nose in a book but highly intelligent and resourceful as well, not one to step away from a fight.  In the latter point she was probably a lot more proactive in that than the animated Belle but it was all in keeping with the familiar story.


The Beast was always one of my favourite characters but I have said to people many times before that I always felt Disney got it wrong in the animated film as the Beast was much more handsome as a beast than when he was changed back into the Prince. For me, I just didn’t feel he had that Disney Prince quality that many of the others did.  However this time they got it spot on by casting the gorgeous Dan Stevens (Downton Abbey’s Matthew Crawley) in the title role.  Yes when we first see him, he’s not all that handsome which fits in with his vain, selfish and arrogant young self and as a beast he can be at times truly terrifying.  But when the curse is lifted and he is returned to human form, wow what a handsome prince he makes.  He has a mighty fine voice too, and is given a solo in a new song written for this movie and not from the original soundtrack entitled ‘Evermore’ .




The supporting cast are wonderful, Ian McKellen as the pompous Cogsworth, Ewan McGregor as the charming Lumiere and Emma Thompson as the kindly Mrs Potts. Back in the village Kevin Kline gives a charming performance as Maurice, Belle’s father, going from mad professor to caring father with ease.  Even Gaston is devilishly handsome and I can see why the girls would fall for him, if he wasn’t such an evil swine (in the back Gaston? Not good form).  Luke Evans brings a handsome villainy to the proceedings and Josh Gad is delightful as his ever adoring sidekick Le Fou, although in a change from the animated version it’s nice to see the little guy get a happy ending too.  




The soundtrack is pretty much as the original movie with classics such as Something There, The Mob Song, Belle, Gaston and a fabulous version of Be Our Guest.  However as mentioned before there are a couple of new numbers inserted in, but there is no 'Human Again', the song which was written for the original movie then cut then reinserted again following the inclusion in the musical.  I was fully expecting to see it in this version but sadly it was not to be. Instead there was a new number called ‘Days in the Sun’ but it’s not as good as ‘Human Again’.

I don’t want to dwell on the whole Stockholm Syndrome issue as I have always viewed this film (and indeed the original fairytale) for the romantic story it was designed to be and nothing more. As for the controversy surrounding the character of Le Fou being gay, I couldn’t give a flying fig and whilst it is certainly implied, it’s nothing more than a dance.


To summarise, I was enchanted by this movie just as much as I was by the 1991 animated version and despite some little tweaks to the storyline, I am eagerly anticipating the DVD release of this, so I can watch it as many times as I have watched the original and get lost in the fairytale once again.



Rating:



A worthy remake and enchanting



Monday, 13 March 2017

Musing Mondays - Witches of East End & writing book reviews


Musing Monday, February 27, 2017

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:


  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

 I’m currently (re-)reading…


Witches of East End by Melissa de la Cruz

I wanted to finally read the second and third books in this series because the second book Serpent's Kiss has been sitting on my TBR shelves since it was released in 2012. However, I read the first book way back in 2011 when it was first published, so that means a re-read before I can finish the series. This is a trend you should expect to see a lot this year because I am trying to read through as much of my TBR shelves as possible and they are mostly filled with sequels to first books that I haven't read recently enough to remember all the details of.

This book series is based loosely, from what I remember, on Norse mythology. That's not something one would really guess from reading the cover blurb because the only potential giveaway there is the name Freya. I also seem to remember there being a tie-in to de la Cruz's Blue Bloods series late in the novel which implies that they are set within the same universe. As I haven't read the Blue Bloods books I can't really make an opinion on that tie-in.

Lifetime tried to adapt the series into a TV show, starring Jenna Dewan Tatum, back in 2013-2014. It only lasted 2 seasons, and I remember it not being a very good adaptation. It wasn't even a stellar show, but it changed a LOT of what I remembered from the book, and not for the good in my opinion.

From the author of the highly addictive and bestselling Blue Bloods series, with almost 3 million copies sold, comes a new novel, Melissa de la Cruz's first for adults, featuring a family of formidable and beguiling witches.

The three Beauchamp women--Joanna and her daughters Freya and Ingrid--live in North Hampton, out on the tip of Long Island. Their beautiful, mist-shrouded town seems almost stuck in time, and all three women lead seemingly quiet, uneventful existences. But they are harboring a mighty secret--they are powerful witches banned from using their magic. Joanna can resurrect people from the dead and heal the most serious of injuries. Ingrid, her bookish daughter, has the ability to predict the future and weave knots that can solve anything from infertility to infidelity. And finally, there's Freya, the wild child, who has a charm or a potion that can cure most any heartache.

For centuries, all three women have been forced to suppress their abilities. But then Freya, who is about to get married to the wealthy and mysterious Bran Gardiner, finds that her increasingly complicated romantic life makes it more difficult than ever to hide her secret. Soon Ingrid and Joanna confront similar dilemmas, and the Beauchamp women realize they can no longer conceal their true selves. They unearth their wands from the attic, dust off their broomsticks, and begin casting spells on the townspeople. It all seems like a bit of good-natured, innocent magic, but then mysterious, violent attacks begin to plague the town. When a young girl disappears over the Fourth of July weekend, they realize it's time to uncover who and what dark forces are working against them.

With a brand-new cast of characters, a fascinating and fresh world to discover, and a few surprise appearances from some of the Blue Blood fan favorites, this is a page-turning, deliciously fun, magical summer read fraught with love affairs, witchcraft, and an unforgettable battle between good and evil. -- via Goodreads

        THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: Do you post book reviews right after you finish the book? Or do you wait a while so you can fully digest it before posting a review?


I don't actually write reviews very often anymore and that's partially the reason why. When I used to write reviews on my old blog, I had 2 ways of doing it. I would do a weekly review on Fridays of a book I had finished during that week. The other way was to dredge up a book I hadn't read in ages and then write a review on it since I'd had time to really reflect on the story. I stopped doing both because I kind of got burnt out. I love talking about what I'm reading/have read in the past. Talking about books is awesome. But writing reviews felt too forced and it turned reading into too much work. I would feel stressed and compelled to have to finish books quickly in order to review them every Friday. And then sometimes, I would struggle with the reviews for books I hadn't read because I'd want to talk about details but couldn't remember them all enough to do it well. Might start doing discussion posts instead of straight reviews, that could be interesting.


Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Musing Mondays - Which author would I be friends with if I could


Musing Monday, March 6, 2017

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:


  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

I'm not feeling 100% tonight and so can't think of anything I want to write about for the first part of the meme this week. Therefore I am just going to answer the random question!

        THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: If you could be best friends with an author, who would you choose and why?



I have actually given this question some thought throughout the years. I've daydreamed more than once about what it would be like to be friends with someone of my favourite authors. I thought about Douglas Adams when he was still alive, or Eoin Colfer or Garth Nix or Neil Gaiman. And the obvious answer for a HUGE Potterhead like me would be J.K. Rowling, and I would definitely LOVE to be friends with her especially after watching her on Twitter lately. She is just an awesome and amazing and inspirational woman. But I think I'm going to have to say John Green. He is just so personable and likeable and seems very down to earth. He seems like he would be a lot of fun especially when you get him together with his brother Hank.


Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Calendar Girls - Mar 2017 - best book with an active war (in my opinion) - #CalendarGirlsBooks






Calendar Girls is hosted by bloggers, Flavia the Bibliophile and Melanie Noell Bernard – both have amazing blogs full of fun, bookish posts. Calendar Girls is a brand new monthly blog event inspired by Neil Sedaka’s 1961 song Calendar Girl. Just like in the song, we decided to use a specific theme for each month and choose a book based on these themes! The event is meant to incite discussions with other bloggers about books we’ve read and loved, is meant to help bloggers meet other bloggers, and also for bloggers and readers to find out about blogs which they normally may not have come across! Want to know more? Click on the links above! And it’s not too late to jump on the Calendar Girl train! Join now!

Best book with an active war


I am so excited to talk about the book I chose this month and to share it with all of you. The minute I saw the topic for March I knew exactly what book I was going to choose. This book has been sitting on my TBR pile since I bought it last year waiting patiently for me to get to it, and I have been very eager to get to it. Now a caveat, I am still in the process of reading it, I started it on Sunday, but I still believe it is the best choice for best book with an active war. The further I get into it the more solidified that opinion becomes. I'm enjoying this book so much that I looked it up right after starting it to see when the next one would be out, saw that it was released on Jan 31, 2017, and promptly ordered it. It is now sitting on my TBR shelf waiting for me to finish the first book. My pick is a genre that I don't actually read a lot from but would like to start reading more of, historical fiction. It has a premise that was just too perfectly to my tastes for me to not be 100% drawn to it. So without further ado, I give you my choice for the best book with an active war:

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Musing Mondays - Mortdecai & book destruction


Musing Monday, February 27, 2017

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:


  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

 I’m currently reading…

Mortdecai by Kyril Bonfiglioli - aka Don't Point That Thing At Me.

I was in search of short books from my TBR shelves last week to fulfil my self-inflicted challenge to read 7 books over reading week and picked this one up before deciding to switch to graphic novels. I made the switch because I can read graphic novels faster and I had an equal urge to read books and play as much Lego Marvel Avengers as possible last week, so faster was better because it meant more time for my game. How did I do on that challenge you ask? Well, I completed 9 books! The Girl with the Iron Touch, Rebecca's Daughters, volumes 3-6 of Scott Pilgrim, volumes 1 and 2 of Faith and The Girl with the Windup Heart. Now I'm setting about to finish Mortdecai and the other book I am currently reading Front Lines which I plan to discuss further in my March Calendar Girls post.

I first heard about this book via the 2015 Johnny Depp film Mortdecai. The movie was silly, fun silly, par for the course for Jonny Depp. I didn't realise it was an adaptation of a novel until last year when I saw the novel on the Book Outlet. It was cheap so I bought it. So far the novel itself is interesting, very different from the movie, though! I can't understand why they gave Johnny Depp such a deplorable moustache in the film instead of a fat suit because so far Mortdecai's weight has been very much a part of his character. Or better yet why didn't they cast heavier actors in both the Depp and McGregor roles? There are enough really funny heavier guys out there. Stephen Fry would have been hilarious as Mortdecai. Anyway, here's the summary:

Don't Point That Thing At Me by Kyril Bonfiglioli - Book 1 of the Mortdecai Trilogy, now a major motion picture starring Johnny Depp Introducing the Hon. Charlie Mortdecai, art dealer, aristocrat and assassin, in the first of the Mortdecai novels Portly art dealer and seasoned epicurean Charlie Mortdecai comes into possesion of a stolen Goya, the disappearance of which is causing a diplomatic ruction between Spain and its allies. Not that that matters to Charlie ... until compromising pictures of some British diplomats also come into his possession and start to muddy the waters. All he's trying to do is make a dishonest living, but various governments, secret organizations and an unbelievably nubile young German don't see it that way and pretty soon he's in great need of his thuggish manservant Jock to keep them all at bay ... and the Goya safe. First published in the 1970s, this hilarious novel is part Ian Fleming part P G Wodehouse. It is now a major motion picture starring Johnny Depp as Mortdecai, Ewan McGregor as Jock and Gwyneth Paltrow. 'A rare mixture of wit and imaginative unpleasantness' Julian Barnes 'You couldn't snuggle under the duvet with anything more disreputable and delightful' Stephen Fry 'The jokes are excellent, but the most horrible things keep happening... Funny and chilling' Sunday Telegraph Kyril Bonfiglioli was born on the south coast of England in 1928 of an English mother and Italo-Slovene father. After studying at Oxford and five years in the army, he took up a career as an art dealer, like his eccentric creation Charlie Mortdecai. He lived in Oxford, Lancashire, Ireland and Jersey, where he died in 1985. He wrote four Charlie Mortdecai novels, and a fifth historical Mortdecai novel (about a distinguished ancestor). -- via Goodreads

Boo, looks like my public libraries don't seem to have the rest of the series D: Oh well, that's what inter-library loans are for! :)

        THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: Have you ever accidentally destroyed a book? Such as accidentally dropped it in the tub, or run it over with a bike? How about accidentally on purpose or simply purposefully?


Yes, I have accidentally destroyed multiple books in my lifetime. The most ironic one was probably when I was a lifeguard and my lifeguard manual promptly drowned when I dropped it into the pool at an in-service training day. It was never the same again. I think it's still upstairs in my room all bendy and wobbly from drying funny. My copy of The Giver is similarly water damaged but I can no longer remember the incident or incidents that led to it getting in that condition. When I worked at the local public library as a Page I had to admit to my boss that she was going to have to charge me for a replacement fee because I stupidly left a library book sitting on the vanity in the bathroom and it was then knocked into the toilet...The most recent one though was not my fault it's totally 100% my dog Ria's fault - she ate one of my books from the current library I work at. It's one of those hardcovers with the cardboard spine and the spine it just an absolute mess now. I'm still holding onto it because I reaaaaaally don't want to pay the replacement fee yet.

The funniest destroyed book I've seen though was at work either in December of last year or January of this year, I think it was in January. Anyway, my co-worker Melanie and I digitise book chapters as part of our job. We have a scanner in our office but it was acting up and we had a lot to scan so we went out to use the public machines so we could both scan. I'm scanning away with my back to her and then all of a sudden all I hear from about 10 feet away is a really loud SNAP! She's pressed down on a book, and it promptly split right down the centre becoming a two volume item haha. Our Collections Maintenance Manager was able to fix it, but we still tease Melanie about hulking out on the books. What made it even funnier was that it was a book about respect - clearly we didn't respect it!


Monday, 20 February 2017

Musing Mondays - blind date with a book & book smell


Musing Monday, February 20, 2017

Musing Mondays is a weekly meme that asks you to choose one of the following prompts to answer:


  • I’m currently reading…
  • Up next I think I’ll read…
  • I bought the following book(s) in the past week…
  • I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I’m really upset by (book/author/bookish-news)…
  • I can’t wait to get a copy of…
  • I wish I could read ___, but…
  • I blogged about ____ this past week…

I’m super excited to tell you about (book/author/bookish-news)…my library's BLIND DATE WITH A BOOK event last week


Last week at work we had a blind date with a book event organised by the Outreach Librarian. Blind book selections are all the rage in libraries and bookstores right now, vert trendy. What you do is you take a book, wrap it in craft paper, and then put a 3-5 word description of the book on the paper. The goal being to make the books sound exciting so people choose them. In choosing them you're hoping to get something you'll enjoy, but also something you might never have picked yourself. Anyone who knows me knows I have a little bit of an obsession with blind boxes and things like that, I love the surprise of seeing what I'm actually going to get. Therefore it should be no surprise that I ended up with 3 of the blind date books.



Rebecca's Daughters by Dylan Thomas


This is the first book I scooped up. It was really down to the "derring-do", that was what caught my attention, I needed to know what this book was. I didn't read the whole summary, just enough to see that it was set in the 19th century in Wales. I'm on a steampunk kick so I thought why not give it a try it since I had it! It's under 200 pages so I figured I could get it done in about 2 hours. I started reading it on Wednesday and read for 50 minutes and then I haven't picked it back up again. But I do plan to finish it tonight. I'm up to page 61.


If I were going to re-wrap this book and put it back on a blind date with a book table here's how I would describe it: 19th-century, cross-dressing Welsh Batman:


Rebecca’s Daughters is the nearest Dylan Thomas ever came to realizing his ambition to write a film scenario in such a way that it would not only stand ready for shooting but would, at the same time, give the ordinary reader a visual impression of the film in words. A romantic adventure story set in mid-nineteenth-century Wales, Rebecca’s Daughters has a dashing hero who is not what he seems; commonfolk oppressed by the landowners; and finally, justice triumphant over greed and misused privilege. Who is the mysterious "Rebecca" swathed in wide black skirts with a shawl drawn over his mouth and his eyes flashing from beneath the brim of his tall black hat as he exhorts his "daughters" to tear down the hated tollgates imposed by the gentry’s Turnpike Trust? And where does the foppish Anthony Raine––just returned from a tour in India with the despised British army––stand? And how is the lovely Rhiannon to choose between them? -- via Goodreads


The Tiger in the Smoke (Albert Campion #14)  by Margery Allingham


I was only planning on taking 1 book, but I should have known myself better. I succumbed to this book for the same reasons I grabbed the first one, the description. I wanted to know what kind of treasure and havoc! I am too curious for my own good sometimes!! My coworker Melanie was with me when I unwrapped this one, and because we work in an Academic library we don't keep the dust jackets on our hardcovers, so neither of us had any idea what this book was just based on the title. Thankfully Goodreads exists.


Once I found out on Goodreads that Tiger in the Smoke is actually the 14th book in the series Melanie and I agreed I should probably try and get my hands on the first book and start with that to get a sense of the character. Luckily one of the libraries in our consortium owns a copy, so I've got that on its way to me so I can read it before I read this one:


Meg's marriage to self-made millionaire Geoffrey Levett should have been happy, until she began receiving photos of her late husband Martin, presumed dead in WWII. She calls on old friend Albert Campion to get to the bottom of things. For Campion, the case was cut and dry - until a brutal triple murder.

All the books from Albert Campion series are standalone titles and can be read in any order.  -- via Goodreads



Among Others  by Jo Walton


I certainly wasn't planning on 3 of them...This one had been sitting there for a few days, I expect that was because a lot of people made the assumption that I made. I assumed that it was our copy of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone so I wasn't going to take it because I own 4 copies of that book in various formats and have read it about a dozen times. But my curiosity got the better of me again and I had to know if I was right. I brought the book over the the user services desk and scanned the barcode, obviously, it wasn't Philosopher's Stone and I'd never heard of Among Others so to Goodreads I went once more.


After reading the synopsis on Goodreads I just had to bring this book home with me. How could I not when it's got a premise so close to my absolute #1 favourite series? And it's pretty highly rated. I'm really shocked I've never heard of this book before now. It's not even that old because it came out in 2011:

Startling, unusual, and yet irresistably readable, Among Others is at once the compelling story of a young woman struggling to escape a troubled childhood, a brilliant diary of first encounters with the great novels of modern fantasy and SF, and a spellbinding tale of escape from ancient enchantment.

Raised by a half-mad mother who dabbled in magic, Morwenna Phelps found refuge in two worlds. As a child growing up in Wales, she played among the spirits who made their homes in industrial ruins. But her mind found freedom and promise in the science fiction novels that were her closest companions. Then her mother tried to bend the spirits to dark ends, and Mori was forced to confront her in a magical battle that left her crippled--and her twin sister dead.

Fleeing to her father whom she barely knew, Mori was sent to boarding school in England–a place all but devoid of true magic. There, outcast and alone, she tempted fate by doing magic herself, in an attempt to find a circle of like-minded friends. But her magic also drew the attention of her mother, bringing about a reckoning that could no longer be put off…

Combining elements of autobiography with flights of imagination in the manner of novels like Jonathan Lethem’s The Fortress of Solitude, this is potentially a breakout book for an author whose genius has already been hailed by peers like Kelly Link, Sarah Weinman, and Ursula K. Le Guin.   -- via Goodreads

I'd like to try and read all 3 of these this week. I'm sort of setting myself a personal mini-challenge in that regard. It's what we call reading week at work, so the students are all off for the middle of their term. You might know it by spring break or half-term break but we call it reading week. So I'm going to have my own personal reading week by attempting to finish 7 books this week. I've already finished 1 (finished The Girl with the Iron Touch this morning) and if I finish Rebecca's Daughters tonight too then I am on track to meet that goal :)

        THIS WEEK’S RANDOM QUESTION: Do you like new book smell? Old book smell? All book smell?


My original answer was going to be all book smell with the exception of musty books. But then I realised that I had both an old book and a new book right on my desk thanks to Tiger in the Smoke and the copy of The Invisible Library that I've borrowed from a friend, which was recently purchased. So I sniffed both - and I definitely found the new book smell to be more pleasant than the old book smell. Some old books do smell amazing, though, and in large quantities old book smell just makes me happy. That's why I like wandering up in the stacks at work.

Which type of book smell do you prefer?